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Maximise Your Profit Margins With Design Collaboration (8/9): How to create project transparency and clarify approval lines

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Benefit 8: Create project transparency and clarify approval lines

We’ve already mentioned it a couple of times: ‘Collaboration for Revit’ (C4R) helps to close the gap between designers and other stakeholders (reviewers). Communication is critical and the more relevant project information is up on BIM 360 Team (the storage component of C4R), the better: we can track markups, the ‘Large Model Viewer’ (LMV) can visualise just about any file format (including revit files with its references), designers can start a live review session, etc.

In fact, we can upload just about any file, relevant to the project, to BIM 360 Team (Tech specs, minutes of meeting, commissioning checklists, etc).

But how easy is it to reference these non-design documents to technical components? Quite easy, as it turns out. All we need to do, is note down the link to the document on BIM 360 team and then copy it to the URL property inside of the revit family type.

By uploading the file to BIM 360 team, all parameters are exposed to the LMV, which means we can select the component within the viewer, open the property window and click on the hyperlink in the URL property. This will then open up the linked document.

In previous blog posts, we’ve also looked at how reviewers can add comments through redlining.

But they can also check the design changes as they specified them. In other words, they can check out the differences in two versions.

As BIM 360 team keeps track of all versions, uploaded to the system, we can have a look at the history of a document and select two versions to compare.

The end results show us what has been deleted, added and changed (on a geometrical level, as well as on the metadata or information level).

Obviously, these two aspects (linking documents and comparing versions), make a project structure much more understandable and provides a follow-up system in the communication between designers and reviewers.

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Ives Veelaert

After obtaining his master's degree in engineering, Ives Veelaert was a data management consultant within the architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) space for several years. He has helped set up the data management structure for many companies, including for the renovation of the European Community building in Brussels. He ...

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