Opinion

ICE BIM 2016 – Part 4

 

The final straight, following on from part 3 all that remained now were the closing presentations of the day:

Building the Francis Crick Institute

Neil Smith (Laing O’Rourke) provided a superb summary of the effort that had gone into this project - a genuinely forward thinking and pioneering scientific research establishment. This presentation featured some beaufiful walkthroughs that were played alongside actual video footage of the finished facility (mirrored shot for shot) and the realism of the initial renders were uncanny.

Four people permanently federated the models so that the as-built was pretty much 95% of “everything” that went into it.

Ian Bush (Black & Veatch) asked what was the biggest headache of all and getting the design team to work on the right platform was a clear winner (otherwise a lot of Tier 1 remodelling would take place). Managing supply chain expectations also came in there too.

An excellent project and worthy of digging deeper in your own time.

Panel Discussion; BIM Level 2 – “Business as Usual” by 2020[?]

So, will BIM be “business as usual” by 2020? Anne kicked off the debate by stating that she hoped 75% of the demand chain and 75% of the supply chain would be. She also pointed out that Level 2 needs to be seen as a step towards Digital Built Britain and not a rigid defined milestone. “If we set up Level 2 KPI’s and metrics it will become a box ticking exercise rather than thinking about how to continually deliver better and transform”. Indeed have the BIM “levels” had their day?

Teodoro pointed out that in 2008 there was a consensus that it would be business as usual by now (2016) but he admitted that there are more intelligent clients emerging of late and BIM is increasingly becoming the norm.

Alain reflected that in terms of the design side then definitely business as usual by 2020, but industry needs a defining “moment” or as he called it it’s “iPhone 3s”. The ones before being useful but unspectacular (and unfinished).

Anne noted that “FM had been feeling very left out for a long time but are now feeling much more a part of it” which brought nods from everyone in the room. Whereas Tim Boyd recalled that he asked one prominent industry player who retorted that “BIM is probably a good idea” showing that not all sectors were really taking it seriously, not even yet.

Challenges for local authorities in terms of Opex and Capex were discussed as were the demographics of the overall workforce. Alain then spoke about the importance of collecting data of the buildings that are in use already and not just new builds, which is an area that is often overlooked (clients capturing how their existing assets perform today, and then using this data to inform their next build).

Other conclusions were that BIM Level 2 was still seen as design and construct but it’s always been about whole life and the community doesn’t need to wait to start to enable their own infrastructure based cultural shift. At the end of the day, even projects like Crossrail (as Malcolm Tayor commented) will manage the asset in a traditional way, citing there are still problems moving from construction to assett management and the wider implementations of digitally enabled projects just like it.

Tim then neatly concluded, with poignance, that at ICE BIM 2012 the debate was “What is BIM?” whereas today at ICE BIM 2016, it still was "What is BIM?" I'm joking, it was “three different civils focussed groups with a host of specialist workshops to boot”. This really summed it up and captured perfectly just how far things have come in such a short space of time.

A great closing statement and a proud moment for us all.

Presentations from all delegates can be found at the ICE website here, with tweets from the day captured via #ICEBIM

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